Classroom Distractions Fragment Instruction

Classroom distractions fragment instruction and represents a huge obstacle for students to benefit from their single opportunity to receive full instruction on a topic.  When assigning blame for the failures of schools this is rarely discussed.  Video instruction overcomes this obstacle.

Like commercial television, math instruction in a classroom of 20-30 students is typicallly quite fragmented if not downright distracting.  Continuity of thought and following the inherent logical progressions in math instruction is very difficult for any student to sustain.  Video instruction is continuous, uninterrupted instruction.  Since Video instruction being better organized it is more concise and can be completed well within the optimum attention span limits of most students.  Longer presentations common to classroom instruction exceed this attention span limit and minds begin to wander.

Teachers are distracted by administrative duties and using class time to address an never ending array of individual students' extra demands concerning missed assignments, makeup work, and coordination of asssignments for future planned absences.

As instruction begins, students' questions that range from relevant to frivolous stops instruction and flow of thought being developed.   Unmotivated and disengaged students can be very clever and effective in disrupting instruction.  Their antics can be either subtle and blatant.  Addressing  blatantly disruptive behavioral issues is not only distracting but also cast a uncomfortable pall in the class.

Producing and clearing board work or fussing with technology stops instruction.

Video instruction provides uninterrupted, continuous instruction.   The production of instructional videos have been thoughtfully produced, directed, edited, and can include the effective use of graphics.  Since video instruction is better organized and more concise the instruction on a topic can be completed well within the optimum attention span limits of most students.  Longer presentations common to classroom instruction exceed this attention span limit and minds begin to wander.  As such, 15-20 minutes of video instruction can more effectively teach a concept than can be accomplished in 50 minutes in a classroom setting.   Homeschooling proponents commonly maintain their children can accomplish more in 2-3 hours than can be accomplished in an entire day in the typical school.

With the purchase of any full course, each student will also receive a free bonus course on Study Skills. 

info@mathclinic.org (410)817-4033                                                                                © Mark Deaton 2005